When the Rational Heathen Opens a Book on Witchcraft

When the Rational Heathen Opens a Book on Witchcraft

Okay, those of you who have read my stuff know I’m a skeptic when it comes to witchcraft and Magick. (‘Magick’, of course, is the fancy-smancy word for ‘magic,’ because apparently Aleister Crowley thoughts magic had too few letters.

That being said, I’m open-minded when some people tell me I can make myself rich with some spells. Or maybe attract deer during hunting season. Or maybe give my evil neighbor the idea that he really should run off and join the circus, selling his home to some nice people instead.

Heathen Magic

We Heathens are pretty low on the magic and witchcraft meter. Sure, we do divination with runes, but I’ve pretty much decided that it’s not magic, but tapping into the gods and our subconscious minds. We have seidr–and I’m not entirely sure about that. But we also have cool stories of shapeshifters and people performing magic. Not to mention all the curses, spells, ward runes, bindrunes, witchcraft, and other cool shit.

But I can’t help but check out witchcraft books. After all, maybe they’ve got something that could help. At least have money rain down on me. That, my friends, is a worthy spell that I could believe in.

So, I checked out a book under Kindle Unlimited, because yes, I’m cheap and I honestly have already thrown my money at Amazon. It’s called The Spell Book for New Witches: Essential Spells to Change Your Life by Ambrosia Hawthorn.

Which Witch?

Billie Burke and Judy Garland The Wizard of Oz (1939)So, apparently in this book I “borrowed” using my Kindle Unlimited subscription, there’s more than one type of witch. I sort of knew that there were necromancers, Brujas, Voodun, and hedge witches (as well as witches that practice certain forms such as Gardnerian) from my research as a fantasy/science fiction writer, but this book actually broke it down for me.

Apparently there are the following:

  • Elemental Witch
  • Secular Witch
  • Hedge Witch
  • Eclectic Witch
  • Traditional Witch (which has many other subgroups)

And I’ve heard of others, so I think that this book gives a general idea of the types of witches.

So, How Does Magic Work?

Being mostly allergic to the thought that magic actually exists, I try to keep an open mind on this stuff. The explanation I got was that magic comes from things like persons, moonlight, sunlight, crystals and rocks, and nature. Your intent manipulates this stuff. So, you just have to focus your intent to make things happen.

MRL-Hand-Stitched-468x60

Hmm…

So, if I wish really, really hard, I can get a pony? <cough>

Or maybe I can wish my neighbor would sell his house and leave?

When You Need Extra Stuff to Get the Job Done

Apparently you need herbs, candles, crystals, and stuff to focus your energies to get shit done. I don’t understand why if the magic is built on intent, that someone could just cast a spell without all the extraneous stuff. But hey, I’m not a witch.

Maybe people who do this stuff aren’t as focused on shit as I am. Or maybe the sellers of witchy-type goods need to stay in business. Who knows?

If Wishes Were Horses

There’s an old saying, “If wishes were horses, beggars would ride.” Now, I’m not discounting will and intent when it comes to having power, but really, there are a lot of people in this world who wish they could have something that they don’t. Every time I was successful in my life, it wasn’t some sort of magic that brought me there. Instead, it was a plan and a lot of hard work.

That being said, sometimes you catch a lucky break. But I would argue that every time I had a lucky break, I had been “in the neighborhood” figuratively speaking, to get that lucky break. Some shit that has shown up “out of the blue” had seeds planted months, or even years, before. Lot of luck is being in the right place at the right time. Just ask any hunter. You seldom find deer in metro areas — or rather, deer you can shoot, other than with a camera.

So, I’ll let you know how this goes. Maybe I’ll just make several million dollars off of this.

Nah…

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2 thoughts on “When the Rational Heathen Opens a Book on Witchcraft

  1. I’m not a witch, but I have read several books on Seidr. I’ve been a Heaten for a few years, so please know I’m not trying to be arrogant in this comment. That book is the worst you could have chosen as an introduction to witchcraft, a word I don’t even like to use, because I understand your hesitation. Some writers go the very feminine route with light airy positive energy stuff and it’s annoying. If you want to read a more practical book on Seidr specifically I recommend either “Seidr, the gate is open” by Katie Gerrard (yes there’s some fluff but mostly I enjoyed her writing and found her insightful) or Edred Thorson’s “Futhark: A Handbook of Rune Magic”. Granted this last book focuses on the runes side of Seidr and Gerrard’s book is more on actual rituals. A good YouTuber is Freya Norling. Anywho hope this helps if you want to pursue the practice further!

    1. Thanks for your comment. Familiar with Seidr and Runes. (Better with runes, actually.) Not so convinced with Seidr. If you’re familiar with my blog, you know I have an aversion to the “M” word. So, I found the witchy book to be amusing.

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